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www.HFRP.org

The Harvard Family Research Project separated from the Harvard Graduate School of Education to become the Global Family Research Project as of January 1, 2017. It is no longer affiliated with Harvard University.

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Book Review: The Influence of Teachers: Reflections on Teaching and Leadership

In this review of The Influence of Teachers: Reflections on Teaching and Leadership, Ashley Chu, an early childhood teacher in Washington, DC and a former research assistant for Harvard Family Research Project, provides her personal reflections on the book's messages and her views on the book's implications for family engagement in education. 

Ashley Chu (August 2011) Research Report

Book Review: Inviting Families into the Classroom: Learning from a Life in Teaching

This book by Lynne Yermanock Strieb provides readers with insights on family engagement from the perspective of someone with 31 years of experience teaching kindergarten and first and second grade in Philadelphia public schools. While Inviting Families into the Classroom discusses parent–teacher relationships more broadly, this book review focuses on its valuable lessons on building relationships with families whose children are transitioning into elementary school.

Ashley Chu (April 14, 2011) Research Report

Self, Family, Community, and Schooling

This course, with its fieldwork component, takes gradual and small steps in grappling with the constituent parts of culture. Taking the notion of self as a center of relationship, we adopt a bottom-up approach in tracing how culture dialectically implicates individual mind and selfhood. Forming several research teams, each group will undertake an empirical studies in designated field sites. Each team, using methodological tools available in visual anthropology and video ethnography (with support from the teaching and technical staff), will be required to relate their research findings to one or more theoretical themes covered in this course.

Lee-Beng Chua () Syllabus

Free. Available online only.

Research Update 5: STEM Out-of-School Time Programs for Girls

Out-of-school time (OST) programs that focus on girls’ involvement in STEM can play an essential role in improving female representation in these traditionally male-dominated fields. OST programs offer girls a non-threatening and non-academic environment for hands-on learning that is collaborative, informal, and personal. However, barriers to quality implementation and outcome-based evaluation present challenges for STEM programs serving girls. This Research Update highlights findings from the evaluations and research studies in the OST Database that focus on STEM programs for girls.

Katie Chun , Erin Harris (January 2011) Research Report

Free. Available online only.

Making Families Matter at Two-Year Colleges: Training the Early Childhood Workforce to Support Families

Julia Coffman , Heather B. Weiss (1999) Research Report

$10.00 . 75 Pages.

A User's Guide to Advocacy Evaluation Planning

A User's Guide to Advocacy Evaluation Planning was developed for advocates, evaluators, and funders who want guidance on how to evaluate advocacy and policy change efforts. This tool takes users through four basic steps that generate the core elements of an advocacy evaluation plan, including what will be measured and how.

Julia Coffman (Fall 2009) Tool for Evaluation

Free. Available online only.

Lessons in Evaluating Communications Campaigns: Five Case Studies

This paper examines how communication campaigns with different purposes (individual behavior change and policy change) have been evaluated. It offers a discussion of theories of change that can guide evaluation planning, along with five case studies of completed campaign evaluations. Each case study includes lessons from the evaluation and the paper finishes with a set of cross-case-study lessons gleaned from these evaluations and others.

Julia Coffman (June 2003) Research Report

Free. Available online only.

Public Communication Campaign Evaluation: An Environmental Scan of Challenges, Criticisms, Practice, and Opportunities

This report presents what has been happening in the field of public communication campaign evaluation in recent years. It examines evaluation challenges, criticisms, and practice and includes sections on relevant theory, outcomes, and useful methods for designing evaluations. It ends with opportunities for the road ahead.

Julia Coffman (May 2002) Research Report

Free. Available online only.

Learning From Logic Models: An Example of a Family/School Partnership Program

This brief offers a step-by-step approach for developing and using a logic model as a framework for a program or organization’s evaluation. Its purpose is to provide a tool to guide evaluation processes and to facilitate practitioner and evaluator partnerships. The brief is written primarily for program practitioners, but is also relevant and easily applied for evaluators.

Julia Coffman (January 1999) Tool for Evaluation

Free. Available online only.

Preschool for California’s Children: Summary of 2003-2008 Evaluation Findings

This brief summarizes Harvard Family Research Project's evaluation findings about the Preschool for California's Children grantmaking program at its 5-year midpoint.

Julia Coffman , Heather Weiss, Priscilla M.D. Little, Erin Harris, Katie Chun (March 2009) Research Report

Free. Available online only.

Grantmaking to School Districts: Lessons for Foundations

This brief offers lessons and best practices from foundations across the country on grantmaking to school districts. It offers advice to foundations that are considering school district investments for the first time. It also offers a useful "check" to more experienced foundations that want to examine their thinking and approaches against the lessons and practices of other foundations.

Julia Coffman , Heather Weiss, Erin Harris, Priscilla M.D. Little (September 2010) Research Report

Free. Available online only.

Research and Advocacy Collaboration: A New Jersey Case Study

Too often vital research in the early care and education field does not get used effectively for advocacy purposes. While researchers and advocates often share the same goals, they tend to operate on separate tracks. This brief explores how research and advocacy can be bridged for greater effect using strategic communications. By definition, strategic communications means a deliberate plan or tactics for using communications as a channel for achieving a certain result. Collaborative work in the state of New Jersey around the goal of achieving a comprehensive and quality early care and education system is used as a backdrop for learning about effective practice.

Julia Coffman (January 2002) Research Report

Free. Available online only.

Learning by Listening: A Longitudinal Study of Family Literacy

This study explores the reading concepts held by urban families and how home reading practices intersect with school literacy practices.

Catherine Compton-Lilly (June 2005) Research Report

Free. Available online only.

Bridging Multiple Worlds: Building Pathways From Childhood to College

Students' pathways through school can be seen as moving through an academic pipeline to adulthood. The Bridging Multiple Worlds model focuses on how diverse youth, beginning in their middle childhood years, navigate across their worlds of families, peers, schools, and communities as they move along their pathways to college, careers, and family roles in adulthood.

Catherine R. Cooper , Gabriela Chavira, Dawn Mikolyski, Dolores Mena, Elizabeth Dom (January 2004) Research Report

Free. Available online only.

“For the first time I understand what it takes for my own child to graduate”: Engaging Immigrant Families around Data

D’Lisa Crain, Grant Administrator for the Nevada State Parent Information & Resource Center and Parent Involvement Coordinator for the Washoe County School District, talks about using case studies to help immigrant families better understand data as well as training parents to use an online data tool to track student learning and attendance. 

D’Lisa Crain (October 2010) Research Report

British Bangladeshi and Pakistani Families and Education Involvement: Barriers and Possibilities

This study explores the experiences of British Bangladeshi and Pakistani parents in their interactions with schools and their involvement in children’s education.

Gill Crozier , Jane Davies (May 2005) Research Report

Free. Available online only.

Credentialing Caregivers

This paper describes why family support is essential, given current social and economic trends, and stresses the need to bridge child care and family support. The author underscores the need for accessible family support training curricula that can be adapted to audiences of child care providers.

Christiana Dean (1998) Research Report

$7.00 . 25 Pages.

Family Involvement in School and Low-Income Children's Literacy Performance

This groundbreaking study demonstrates that when families' involvement in school increases over the elementary years, children's achievement increases. Furthermore, the authors show that family involvement in school matters most for children whose mothers have less education.

Eric Dearing , Holly Kreider, Sandra Simpkins, and Heather Weiss (January 2007) Research Report

Free. Available online only.

The Promotive Effects of Family Educational Involvement for Low-Income Children

Article in the Journal of School Psychology, 42(6), 445–460. In this article the authors longitudinally examined associations between family involvement, children's feelings about literacy, and children's literacy achievement from kindergarten through fifth grade. Children's feelings about literacy mediated associations between family educational involvement and literacy achievement. Also, family involvement was more positively associated with literacy outcomes for children whose mothers were less educated compared with children whose mothers were more educated.

Eric Dearing , Kathleen McCartney, Heather Weiss, Holly Kreider, Sandra Simpkins (October 2004) Research Report

More Than a Gut Feeling: The Real Value of Family and Community Engagement

Eric Dearing, Associate Professor of Applied Developmental Psychology in the Lynch School of Education at Boston College, discusses the need to use data-based evidence, rather than intuition, to create successful family and community engagement strategies.

Eric Dearing (December 5, 2011) Research Report

School Community Leadership

This course will address the identification and utilization of community resources and the creation of family engagement partnerships, community linkages, and collaborative efforts to provide for the educational, cultural, health, lifelong learning, vocational, and out-of-school needs of students and citizens in a community.

Larry Decker (Spring 2002) Syllabus

Free. Available online only.

“This Is Their House, Too”: An Afterschool Space Designed for and by Teenagers

Engagement in afterschool programming is one way to keep middle and high school youth engaged in their education. Learn about how the Everett Boys & Girls Club located just outside of Boston, uses intentional informality to keep students coming back and wanting more.

Deepa Vasudevan & Jessica Fei (May 20, 2015) Research Report

Making a Decision About College: Should I Stay or Should I Go?

Marisela Castillo, a high school senior, looks forward to going to a good college to prepare her for medical studies, but she knows that she will have to leave her family in order for that to happen. Should Marisela forgo her dreams for the sake of a family who depends on her household contributions? Should she leave her family to pursue those dreams? An interactive version is also available.

Lad Dell (2003) Teaching Case

Free. Available online only.

Year-Round Learning: Linking School, Afterschool, and Summer Learning to Support Student Success

There is growing national discussion about the need to create a more expansive definition of learning to include all the ways that youth can access educational opportunities—not just through the traditional school model, but also through afterschool activities, time spent with the family, and increasingly, through interaction with digital media. This brief introduces and analyzes one approach to expanded learning that provides students—often in distressed areas—with access to quality learning environments across the year.

Sarah Deschenes , Helen Janc Malone (June 2011) Research Report

Participation Over Time: Keeping Youth Engaged from Middle School to High School

This article in Afterschool Matters discusses strategies used by OST programs with high rates of participation.

Sarah Deschenes , Priscilla Little, Jean Grossman, Amy Arbreton (January 2011) Research Report

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Published by Harvard Family Research Project