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www.HFRP.org

The Harvard Family Research Project separated from the Harvard Graduate School of Education to become the Global Family Research Project as of January 1, 2017. It is no longer affiliated with Harvard University.

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Measurement Tools for Evaluating Out-of-School Time Programs: An Evaluation Resource

This Snapshot describes instruments used by current out-of-school time programs to evaluate their implementation and outcomes.

Christopher Wimer , Suzanne Bouffard, Priscilla M.D. Little, Claire Brown Goss (November 2005, updated August 2008) Research Report

Free. Available online only.

Harnessing Technology in Out-of-School Time Settings

This Snapshot reviews the role of technology in OST programs, highlighting the evaluation methods and findings about implementation and youth outcomes.

Christopher Wimer , Billy Hull, Suzanne Bouffard (January 2006) Research Report

Free. 8 Pages.

Learning from Small-Scale Experimental Evaluations of After School Programs

This Snapshot reviews small-scale experimental evaluations of after school programs, highlighting these studies' evaluation strategies and results.

Christopher Wimer (May 2006) Research Report

Free. 8 Pages.

Selection Into Out-of-School Time Activities: The Role of Family Contexts Within and Across Neighborhood

This poster examined disadvantage at the family and neighborhood level and their associations with participation in out-of-school time activities. Specifically, the authors demonstrate that neighborhood socioeconomic status (SES) characteristics (i.e., income, education, and employment) mediate the association between family income, parent education, and ethnicity and children's participation in a variety of activities outside of school. Family income and parent education, for example, are positively associated with an increased probability of youth participating in before- and after-school programs, community programs, and community center activities, but this increased probability is explained entirely by the fact that children in higher income and more educated families live in higher SES neighborhoods. Poster session submitted to Society for Research on Adolescence 2006 Bienniel Meeting, San Francisco, CA.

Christopher Wimer , Eric Dearing (2005) Research Report

Youth Out-of-School Time Participation: Multiple Risks and Developmental Differences

This paper examines whether youth who are at risk, according to child-, family-, school-, and neighborhood-level factors, are less likely to participate in out-of-school time activities, and whether the predictors depend on youth's age or socioeconomic status. Findings reveal that child- and family-level risks are most consistently related to youth's OST participation. However, these relationships emerge only in early and late adolescence, when youth have more autonomy in their decisions about non-school time use. For certain types of activities, namely those that require fees and financial commitments, contextual risks are more strongly associated with OST participation for higher SES families than for lower SES families.

Christopher Wimer , S. Simpkins, E. Dearing, S. Bouffard, P. Caronongan, H. Weiss (2006) Research Report

Research Update 1: Highlights from the OST Database

This Research Update synthesizes findings from the profiles of 15 research and evaluation reports added to the Out-of-School Time Program Research and Evaluation Database in December 2006. It highlights strategies for assessing program processes as well as key outcomes and features of programs that promote positive outcomes.

Chris Wimer (April 2007) Research Report

Free. Available online only.

© 2016 Presidents and Fellows of Harvard College
Published by Harvard Family Research Project